Got Bugs?

Please send in your hemp insect photos to CSU!

Send in images to Whitney.Cranshaw@ColoState.EDU

Please do include the header “Hemp Insect Photo” to make sure that your message will be recognized in the email queue so that it can get most prompt attention.

Hemp producers are encouraged to send in photos of insects they observe associated with the crop.  We will then try to give you an identification of the insect in question.  Photos submitted are highly valued to help improve this website by identifying additional insects that are associated with the crop.

Submitted 2018 Photos!

A drone fly, Eristalis species. These are a type of syrphid fly that is an excellent mimic of a honey bee. The larvae develop in wet mud or small pools of water and are called “rattailed maggots”.Submitted by Hunter Konchan, a grower for CBDRx Natural Healing
Mantis egg mass (ootheca) on hemp stem by Hunter Konchan, a grower for CBDRx Natural Healing
Cocoons of a parasitoid wasp, Cotesia species. The larvae of these wasps develop within and kill caterpillars, such as cutworms. Later, the tiny adult wasps will emerge from these cocoons.. Submitted by Brian Mitchell at CSU
Hemp russet mites on Cannabis leaf under a microscope at CSU
Salticidae, a jumping spider searching for lunch in a hemp field in Gilcrest Colorado
Twospotted spider mite and a hemp russet mite on hemp leaf from Weld County
This is a caterpillar that has been killed by the fungus Beauveria bassiana. This fungus can infect a great many insects and strains of this entomopathogen are commercially available. The insect that is infected seems to be some sort of looper, perhaps cabbage looper or some other generalist feeder. This photograph was taken by Beatrice Dingha, North Carolina State University.
This is a caterpillar of some kind of brushfooted butterfly in the genus Polygonia. One possibility is that it is P. comma, a species widespread in eastern North America, known as the “eastern comma” or “hop merchant”. This photograph was taken by Leah Black, University of Kentucky.
This is a “roost” of male bees of the genus Melissodes. Males of many kinds of solitary bees will rest together on plants during the night; females stay within the nests. This photograph was provided by Ryan Wainer.
This is a tree cricket, Oecanthus species. Tree crickets will chew leaves of a wide variety of plants and many western species are primarily associated with low growing herbaceous plants. This one is from western Colorado and was photographed by Yoav Giladi.
These are eggs of a stink bug. Several kinds of stink bugs can be found on hemp and most feed on flowers and developing seeds. A few develop as predators of other insects and these eggs likely are of a predatory stink bug, perhaps the one known as the spined soldier bug (Podisus maculiventris). Photograph provided by Yoav Giladi.
A mating pair of the lined bird grasshopper, Schistocerca lineata. This is one of the largest grasshoppers that occur in Colorado. However, they do not appear to feed much, if any, on hemp and are not a pest species of the crop. Photograph provided by Yoav Giladi.
A looper in the inchworm family Geometridae. This was photographed by Ericka Kay of the University of Nevada. Caterpillars of similar appearance have been seen in Colorado. The species is unknown.
A California mantid, Stagmomantis californica. This is a native mantid that is present in the southwestern U.S.; related species occur east of the Rockies. Photograph provided by Ericka Kay, University of Nevada.
Adult of the yellow woollybear. Photograph by Hunter Konchan.
Egg mass of some type of woollybear, either the yellow woollybear or the saltmarsh caterpillar. Photograph by Hunter Konchan.
Adult of a plume moth. The larvae of these type of moths develop as leafminers in various types of plants. This one may be the morningglory leafminer, which develops in morningglory and field bindweed. Photograph by Hunter Konchan.
The pale objects on the underside of the caterpillar are larvae of some kind of eulophid wasp that have killed the caterpillar. The species of caterpillar is unknown, but is in the cutworm family. Photograph by Hunter Konchan.

Submitted 2017 Photos!

The puffy brown insect is an “aphid mummy”. This is a cannabis aphid that has a parasitic wasp developing inside it. To the right is a young cannabis aphid that is not parasitized.
This is an “aphid mummy”. It is a winged-stage cannabis aphid that has a parasitic wasp developing inside it.
This is a nearly full-grown larva of the convergent lady beetle.
The white objects on the leaf are old skins of aphids discarded after molting.
Non-biting midge adult. These are very common insects that somewhat resemble mosquitoes but are harmless. Young stages develop in ponds.
This is a corn earworm larva, feeding on developing seeds. Photograph by Janna Beckerman, purduehemp.org
Orbweaver on hemp leaflet
This is a yellow woollybear, an insect that usually shows up late in the season. Photograph by Janna Beckerman, purduehemp.org
Flies massed at wound on hemp stem (Weld County, Colorado). These flies are not feeding on the hemp but are attracted to fluids that ooze from wounds and yeast that are produced at wound sites.
Green June beetles massed on hemp stem. These beetles are not feeding on the hemp but are attracted to fluids that ooze from wounds and yeast that are produced at wound sites. Photograph by Leah Black, University of Kentucky.
Green June beetles massed on hemp stem. These beetles are not feeding on the hemp but are attracted to fluids that ooze from wounds and yeast that are produced at wound sites. Photograph by Carl Redmond, University of Kentucky.
Japanese beetle on hemp. Hemp does appear to be very favored plant by Japanese beetle, but leaf injuries it may produce will likely have little, if any, effects on yield. Photograph by Janna Beckerman, purduehemp.edu
Yellowstriped armyworms feeding on hemp. Photograph by Leah Black, University of Kentucky
Conchuella stink bug egg emergence!
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